Monthly Archives: November 2015

Rescued From The Vaults: Vinnie Colaiuta (1994)

Stretch/GRP Records, released 1994 Most solo albums by sideman drummers are disappointments – not this one. It goes way beyond the call of duty. Vinnie’s obviously been a great listener during his time playing with Frank Zappa, Joni Mitchell, Sting and Chick Corea because he’s assimilated their compositional styles, analysed what works for him and […]

David Sinclair: 25 Years Of Jazz Photography @ Royal Albert Hall

There’s still time to see a rare exhibition of David Sinclair’s jazz photography at the Royal Albert Hall. It is showing as part of the London Jazz Festival and runs until Saturday 28th November. He is possibly best-known for his striking black-and-white photographs which make the most of light and shadow, such as the image […]

DVD Review: Tubby Hayes

It isn’t easy to make a documentary about jazz these days, and that’s an understatement. BBC Four will very occasionally shoehorn some jazz into their output, usually a bought-in product from the States or something from the vaults, but the chances of getting the funding for a new documentary are slim or none. After ‘Whiplash’ […]

Jarrod Lawson @ Shepherds Bush Empire, 14th November 2015

The vacuum left by North London genius Lewis Taylor‘s virtual disappearance from the music scene has left space for various young blue-eyed soulsters (Bo Saris, Allen Stone, Mayer Hawthorne, The Stepkids et al), but Jarrod Lawson has surely emerged as the pick of the bunch. His assured, ambitious and well-received 2014 debut album announced a […]

Album Review: John McLaughlin’s Black Light

Settled band line-ups in jazz are pretty rare. The Duke Ellington Orchestra, Dave Brubeck Quartet, Modern Jazz Quartet, Thelonious Monk Quartet (1964-1968), Medeski, Martin And Wood and The Bad Plus spring to mind. But now master guitarist John McLaughlin’s 4th Dimension quartet, also featuring Gary Husband on keys/occasional drums, Etienne M’Bappe on bass and Ranjit […]

Hans Groiner: Jazz’s Last Taboo?

Does humour belong in jazz? It’s a tough one, whichever way you slice it. Jazz and comedy were certainly frequently intertwined in the ’30s. Later, Spike Jones‘ incredible bands often featured jazz musicians and consistently tickled the funny bone though rarely at the expense of jazz itself – he mainly used the virtuosity of his […]