Wayne Shorter’s Atlantis: 30 Years Old Today

Wayne-Shorter-Atlantis--Press-K-486376

It’s not easy to write about an album that’s so much part of your musical DNA that it haunts you in the middle of the night and yet reveals fresh nuances each time you listen to it. Wayne is one of my all-time musical heroes and has been since I was a teenager when his sax playing and compositions with Weather Report and Miles Davis totally bewitched me. But it wouldn’t be an overstatement to say that it took me 20 years to really appreciate Atlantis, and also to realise that it had to be listened to on CD and listened to loud. The recent remaster, as part of Wayne’s Complete Albums Collection, is the best I’ve ever heard it.

Wayne at The International, Manchester, 1989. Photo by William Ellis

Wayne at The International, Manchester, 1987. Photo by William Ellis

How to describe the magical though totally uncompromising music on Atlantis? It was Wayne’s first solo release after the official split of Weather Report and it’s fair to say it wasn’t the album many fans and critics were expecting. Atlantis surely remains Wayne’s least- understood work.  It’s ostensibly an album of through-composed, acoustic fusion, but that barely covers it. Someone once described it as the soundtrack to an animated children’s comic book – that sort of rings true as well.

Wayne seems to be weaning listeners away from a more bombastic form of jazz/rock towards a new combination of jazz, R’n’B and Third Stream which utilises sophisticated counterpoint and pure composition. Shorter is the only player who gets any significant solo time, but solos are always brief. Acoustic piano, flute, vocals and multiple saxes rather than synths and guitar supply the dense, challenging harmonies. Atlantis could barely be described as a ‘jazz’ album at all; ensemble work and composition generally override individual expression and none of the tracks ‘swing’ in a conventional sense. And yet it’s still an utterly melodic set, full of memorable, criss-crossing themes which jostle for your attention. It takes time to work its magic, but eventually it does.

The opener ‘Endangered Species’ (recently massacred by Esperanza Spalding) is somewhat of a  sweetener at the top of the album, like Sirens luring sailors to their deaths, as Shorter biographer Michelle Mercer noted. Many people, me included, struggled to get very far past it since the remainder of Atlantis sounded somewhat prim and precious in comparison. I wanted to hear Zawinul and Jaco’s blistering lines, Omar Hakim‘s colourful drumming, some virtuosity. But when I studied Atlantis more closely, there are subtle displays of instrumental mastery. Ex-Weather Report drummer Alex Acuna plays a blinder throughout, blazing through the outro of ‘Who Goes There’, Larry Klein’s bass playing is nimble and impressive (try playing along to Wayne’s intricate written lines), Michiko Hill’s piano comping is inventive and Wayne plays some fantastic solos, particularly his Rollins-style tenor on calypso-flavoured ‘Criancas’.

I remember seeing Wayne playing much of this music live to a barely-half-full London Shaw Theatre in late 1985 – it seems that audiences, booking agents and press officers alike were finding his post-Weather Report music a hard sell at this point. Critics were generally puzzled too, although Robert Palmer noted in the New York Times that ‘it’s not an album one should listen to a few times and then knowledgeably evaluate… It is an album to learn from and live with.’

wayne shorter

But if Atlantis was misunderstood and less than commercially successful on its original release, it seems to be gaining fans in the 30 years since. A good yardstick also is that several compositions from the album are still regularly played by Shorter’s esteemed current quartet, particularly the title track, an eerie, labyrinthine tango. ‘The Three Marias’, a treacherous tune in 6/4 inspired by press reports of three Portuguese woman being arrested for writing obscene literature, has even been the unlikely recipient of a few cover versions, perhaps most notably by ex-Police guitarist Andy Summers.

Thanks to William Ellis for use of his photo.

 

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3 comments

  1. I have this album. This post reminds me I ought to rediscover it. I can only remember “3 marias” from it. Great tune. In general, Wayne had a good understanding of Brazilian music, helped by the fact he married one of them. “Ponte de Areia” comes to mind…

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  2. You just turned me on to this album.
    I listening now. On headphones. In a motel. In Palo Alto.
    Wow.
    Thanks, Matt.

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    1. Thanks for dropping by, Doug. You get around, eh?! Are you on vacation? It must seem pretty damn incongruous to hear ‘Atlantis’ in a motel room…but why not? It took me a very long time to ‘get’ the album but once it hits it’s hard to shake.

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